MAGAZINE

October 17th, 2019
Jesse Gussow

 

It’s difficult to put a label on the artwork by Elysia Rose. Which makes it all the more incredible, a stunning collage of many art forms coming together and creating something so visually appealing. Her shot of the main subject is beautiful and pulls you in. The eyes tell a different story, yet blend so well together. It’s beautiful and haunting. Her use of colours just makes the whole piece come together and pops drawing you in. The pieces show such a range of emotions. Vulnerability, strength, passion, love and pain. It’s a beautiful journey within each piece.

 

 

Where are you from?

My response to this question is always followed by a question – Originally or?

I was born in Edmonton, moved to Calgary when I was 11, back to Edmonton when I was 17, Vancouver when I was 19 then Calgary 24 and finally Kimberley at 27.

The short answer is Western Canada.

 

 

How did you get interested in art?

I was introduced to art at a very young age. My best friend’s mom growing up was an artist. I spent a lot of time at their house since it was just down the street from our home. She made clay figurines for theatre and always had us working on little projects. But a major influence has been my father. He owns an auto body shop and I was raised in it. When I was too young to help him fix cars I was choosing car paints and busted car parts in the yard to paint on to “kill time”. My parents eventually separated and I relied on art as a means to release my pain. It wasn’t until 2010 I made the decision to take art seriously and pursue it as a career.

 

 

What inspires your work?

The style would be considered street art/collage/wheat paste. I love the raw grit and texture of street art. The imagery and colours I use is a form of expressing my femininity. Depending on the message I want to convey dictates which parts are hidden, distorted or exchanged all together (for example my use of eyes). It comes down to my personal growth and personal experiences. My work is often called “porn” by those who choose to just see it for the nudity, I work with nude models because it represents vulnerability and transparency. I also use forms to represent the elements and sacred geometry. My pieces are all finished with epoxy resin to encase all the layers and texture and to allow the message to be indestructible.      

 

 

How did your creative process come to be?

In the past, there was a lot of cutting out magazines, newspapers, posters and weeks spent piecing them together. Fortunately, I studied Graphic Design in 2011 which dialled down my process. I create my rough ideas in photoshop then bring to the original. I build my own canvas’ so this takes step 2 in the process. I’m very particular now with how pieces are made and that came with plenty of trial and error.

 

 

How long does it typically take to create a piece from start to finish and what is the complete process?

A piece typically takes me 50 to 70 hours. My process begins with dimensions of the piece. Once that is figured out I create a photoshop file at that size. I then sketch the artwork. Once this is finalized I send files to print, trim and prep the prints. If I don’t have an existing frame I will construct one. My pieces have a minimum of 10 layers of texture and paint as a base. I finish the piece with a few coats of epoxy resin and finally once it’s set and dry I sand the edges and frame the piece.

 

 


If you could create a new animal using existing animals what animals would you use and what would you call your creation?

A deer with butterfly wings! The deer symbolizes gentleness and meekness, that even in the toughest and most challenging times of your life, you can still be gentle and kind. Where the butterfly goes through different stages before it comes out to the world better, stronger, and more beautiful.

Let’s call her Metadoe.

 

 


What does your work say about you?

My work says that I’m a woman born in a country where I am able to express myself freely. I’m able to push the boundaries with nudity and grit.

 

 

What is something someone has said about your work that stuck with you?

Positive or Negative.
People often call my work porn – it’s positive because it creates a space where this idea or thought can be challenged. What is it within yourself that you identify nudity with sex?  

 

 

What do you want people to experience when they view your work?

I want people to experience vulnerability and transparency – to relinquish their mask and recognize beauty in a nonconventional way.

 

 

How has your work evolved from when you first started to now?

Ho-Boy, through a lot of trial and errors my work has refined. BUT, I am still learning everyday. Experimenting with new techniques and playing around with a camera and models. Went from cutting models out of a magazine to shooting my own. A major influence is design school.

 

 

Do you listen to music when you are creating? if so what kind of music do you prefer?

I listen to music from the moment I wake up to the moment I fall asleep. I listen to mostly R&B, jazz, rap and electronic regularly but can easily dip into some Marilyn Manson, alternative rock and metal.

 

 

How would you describe your studio space? is it a mess or neat and tidy?

Organized chaos.

 

 

What is the important imagery in your work? Your use of colours, flowers and birds must all have some meaning.

The imagery and colours all wrap together as a package. The use of eyes, pose of the model, or elements (water, earth, fire, air), animals used are based on their spiritual symbolisms.

 

 

If you weren't an artist what job would you have?

I would be a chef. I love food and the creation of it. If I’m not working in my studio you can find me in the kitchen.

 

 

Do you prefer Oreo or Fudgee-O cookies?

Oreo 100%   

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